Category Archives: Real Estate Market Trends

Millennials Are Redefining Home-Buying Standards—and Gen Z Is Next

The home-buying approach varies from generation to generation—and in order to overcome down payment hurdles, millennial buyers are transforming the standards of homeownership set by baby boomers, according to the 2017 Zillow Group Report. In fact, less than half (39 percent) of millennials submit offers with the recommended 20 percent down payment. Twenty-one percent put down the minimum: 5 percent or less.

The financial challenges don’t stop at down payments. Thirty-three percent of millennial buyers report having difficulty qualifying for a loan, and 43 percent have trouble finding out what they can afford. These complications likely stem from a lack of experience, as 71 percent of millennial buyers are purchasing their first home.

“In many cities across the U.S., the housing market is extremely competitive, especially for first-time buyers who are looking to purchase a starter home,” says Zillow Chief Economist Dr. Svenja Gudell. “Young buyers often start their careers in fast-growing cities in which the market is particularly tough—and they’re trying to save for a down payment while making record-high rent payments.”

Millennials, however, will look for creative ways to achieve the home-buying dream. Twenty-nine percent of millennial buyers ask friends or family for down payment help, often coming up with the full amount using various sources.

Millennials will also jump on the opportunity to claim a home. They do not shy away from multiple offer situations, and are not afraid to go over budget. More than 53 percent of first-time millennial buyers make multiple offers on the homes they want, and 37 percent don’t keep to their financial plan. This can prevent future plans to sell if market conditions don’t allow the sale of the home to cover remaining mortgage balances. The typical homeowner still owes 62 percent of their home’s value and 46 percent of millennial sellers won’t sell their home in their desired price range.

The economic landscape may or may not change for the next generation, but they will likely tackle these financial challenges in their own way, the report shows. Generation Z is just now starting to enter the housing market as renters.

“It’s encouraging to see that Generation Z is inheriting the same notion of what home means as their parents and millennial siblings,” says Jeremy Wacksman, chief marketing officer at Zillow Group. “These tech-savvy yet risk-averse renters are bringing their social personalities home, desiring communal amenities geared toward bringing people together.”

While Generation Z buyers embrace homeownership as fundamental to achieving the American Dream, high rent prices may stand in the way when it comes time for them to buy. Thirty-seven percent of renters who didn’t move in the past year state that lack of affordability is the main reason for staying put.

The millennial generation is redefining the way homeownership is approached, and Generation Z will have its own impact on the housing market in a few years, the report shows—especially since they will likely outnumber millennials by nearly 1 million people by 2020.

“As they mature and look toward homeownership, it will be interesting to see how their aspirations and preferences will shape the housing market,” says Wacksman.

by: Liz Dominguez, RISMedia’s associate content editor

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Cary & Surrounding Area: AFFORDABILITY

Home Affordability in Cary & Surrounding Area Hits 25.4% This Month

Real estate professionals are the best resource for their customers’ housing and marketplace questions. When your buyers and sellers ask, “How does affordability in Cary & Surrounding Area stack up?” the following information on home affordability will help you answer real estate marketplace questions and can provide you with a detailed report on all of the zip codes that make up the Cary & Surrounding Area marketplace. When looking at what makes homes in a certain area affordable to buyers, factors including home prices, mortgage rates and household income are key. The Affordability Index, provided by HouseCanary, measures median household income relative to the income needed to purchase a median-priced house. This week for Cary & Surrounding Area, the data show:

Property lookup: What is the risk of home values decreasing in your area in the next year? Enter a property street address followed by the zip code to find out: see the link below-

http://rismedia.com/msa-branded/?msa=39580-605&dow=2&sub=200363678&stat=1&zip=27511

Triangle home prices up in May, but demand might be leveling off

Single-family home sales in the Triangle were up 3 percent in May, with the average sale price up 8 percent year-to-date – but sales in Wake County have been lagging for two months.

According to Triangle Multiple Listing Service, sales in Wake County were down 2.2 percent in May compared to the year prior and averaged nearly $332,000. Sales in April had also been down by a rate of 1.2 percent.

The reports indicate that buyers who can’t afford – or don’t want to pay – the higher home prices in Wake County neighborhoods have started looking to neighboring counties where homes are cheaper.

Home sales in Durham County, where the average home price was $250,106 in May, increased 12.4 percent to a volume of 562 units sold. Durham’s average home price is up 6.9 percent year-to-date.

Johnston County sales were up 6.4 percent to 380 units, with an average price of $211,535. The county’s average home price is up 7.8 percent year-to-date.

Orange County home sales, where the average price is nearly $389,000, was flat with 224 units sold in May, the same number as the year prior. Orange County’s average home price is down 1.7 percent year-to-date.

All of the Triangle’s core counties have been working with an anemic level of inventory of homes for sale since 2014, and in May, the inventory level dropped to 2.5 months of supply. The average days on market dropped to 42 days in May compared to a 48-day average in May the year prior.

On one company’s website, it was stated that with a continuing high demand from buyers, sellers might be tempted to list their home at a higher price with the idea that they can reduce the price later.  That’s probably not a good strategy.

The National Association of Realtors has studied this and found that a home that is overpriced will often result in decreased buyer activity. If a home is priced correctly for the market, 60 percent of potential buyers will look at it. When a home is priced 10 percent above market value, the interested buyer pool drops to 30 percent.

“Your home will receive the most interest and foot traffic within the first few days of listing. If it’s priced too high, buyers won’t come back later for a second look,” Riley says.

by: Amanda Hoyle; Triangle Business Journal