Category Archives: Real estate

Ranking the Triangle neighborhoods with highest same-home resale value

In Franklin County’s Lake Royale subdivision, prospective homebuyers can find larger lakefront properties for sale behind the community’s private gates. In Raleigh, at the Harrington Grove neighborhood, home hunters can tour residencies that are just minutes from Research Triangle Park but also a short drive from the city’s restaurants and night life.

Both areas are near the top of the list of Triangle subdivisions that have seen the highest appreciation of resale homes through the first nine months of 2017.

There’s one caveat, however. The analysis looks at houses that were first sold between 2013 and 2016 — and then resold this year through September. The apples-to-apples comparison presents a picture of the market value of the same house over a period of four-plus years.

Residential home sales observers note that examining appreciation for resales of the same homes in specific subdivisions provides a closer and more exact look at how the residential market is changing in some areas. The list is filled with subdivisions near and far, both luxury and starter homes, and paints a picture of the different attributes homebuyers are looking for in the Triangle, especially those who may be new to the area.

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Top 10 Most Expensive Mistakes You’re Making on Your Home

Homes cost a lot of money to maintain. But are you spending extra money unnecessarily on upkeep? Here are 10 of the most expensive mistakes you could be making in your home.

1. Using Traditional Light bulbs

If you still have incandescent light bulbs in your home, you could be throwing a lot of money away every month on inflated electric bills. Over its life span, an incandescent bulb can use $180 worth of electricity. A CFL will only use $41 worth of electricity over the same time period. Even better is the LED bulb, which only uses $30 per bulb. Think what replacing every light bulb in your home could do to your home’s bottom line.

2. Ignoring a Leaky Faucet

A leaky faucet that drips one drop per second can waste more than 3,000 gallons per year, which is enough water to take more than 180 showers. Some of us live in areas where water is plentiful, but for those of us in areas plagued with drought, this could be costing you a fortune, besides being wasteful.  Fix or replace your leaky faucet and save a ton on your water bill.

3. Using the Wrong Air Filter Size

We all sometimes forget to change out the air filters for our HVAC systems or accidentally buy the wrong size. But using the wrong filter or a dirty filter can increase your power bill and cause expensive problems for your furnace down the road. Use the correct filters for your system, and set a reminder to change them after the recommended amount of time. You won’t regret it.

4. Not Customizing Temperature

Invest in a customizable thermostat. If you’re away at the office all day, you can program your heater to shift down a few degrees while you’re gone and then shift back up shortly before you return home. Heating or cooling an empty home wastes a lot of money in energy costs.

5. Not Adjusting Air Vents Properly

Is one room in your home hot, while the others are cold? Oftentimes homeowners will crank up the air conditioning in the whole house to combat hot temperatures in one area. Instead, adjust air vents to direct the flow of air more evenly throughout your entire home. Professionals will come regulate this to ensure that your entire home is receiving the same amount of air conditioning or heating.

6.Over Watering Lawn

Many homeowners have their sprinkler systems programmed to come on in the early morning hours for optimum lawn health. This can become a problem, however, if you’re never around to see what you’re actually watering. A broken sprinkler head could be causing a fountain, or the trajectory of your sprinkler may be directed at a fence instead of your lawn. Periodically run your sprinklers during the day so you can see how they are performing when you’re not around.

7. Water Heater Temperature Set Too High

Unless you have a tankless water heater, your water heater is keeping the water in its tank hot 24/7. If you don’t keep an eye on the temperature as each season changes, you may be paying too much to heat your water. Decrease the temperature in the summer, and bump it back up when winter comes.

8. Leaky Windows and Doors

Leaky windows and doors are great places for cold, winter winds to enter your home. Many homeowners simply ignore them and crank up their heaters. Caulk leaky windows and put rubber seal around doors to keep winter winds out and warmth in.

9. Paying a Handyman

Don’t pay a handyman for a job that is simple enough to do yourself. If you’re unsure of how to do something, look up video tutorials online. Doing simple tasks yourself can save you a lot of money.

10. Ignoring Curled Shingles

It may be easy to ignore problems on your roof, but it will only lead to bigger problems later. If you see any possible issues with your roof, repair them as soon as possible, as this will save you significant costs later.

By Cary Teller; RISMedia’s Housecall

Triangle homes selling at ‘historically’ rapid rate

Home sales in the Triangle’s 16-county region were up nearly 4 percent in October, and the median sales price is 8 percent above the same time period last year. Meanwhile, the average number of days a home stays on the market sunk 10 percent to 44 on the year, compared to 49 at this point in 2016, according to Triangle Multiple Listing Service.

In a separate report for the month of October, appraiser Stacey Anfindsen found that within the four core counties of Wake, Orange, Durham and Chatham, a house stayed on the market for an average of just 36 days.

“That’s historically low,” says Anfindsen, whose publication is titled the Triangle Area Residential Realty report. “It’s gone down in increments. We’re kind of at the bottom of that now.”

While homebuyers are snapping up houses at record rates, housing supply also continues to narrow. In October, the Triangle’s four core counties had an average of two months of housing inventory available. Typically, market equilibrium for inventory is considered to be about 6 months of supply.

In particular, inventory is low for homes under $400,000, and that can stifle sales, Anfindsen says. These trends aren’t new – it’s been this way for the last two years. And they seem to be holding across the board for each of the Triangle’s core counties.

The story is slightly different in Wake County, where home sales inched up 1.5 percent in October and 2.5 percent on the year. Still, the median sale price is up 8.8 percent, at $284,000. In Orange County, home sales are more sluggish. They are down 2 percent on the year, and the median home price dipped slightly, by 0.3 percent, to $306,000.

By , Triangle Business Journal