Tag Archives: North Carolina

48 Hours in Raleigh, N.C.: Where to Eat and Drink

North Carolina’s capital is a hot-spot destination for foodies and culture seekers alike, with restaurants founded by nationally-acclaimed chefs, an abundance of arts offerings, happening music venues, a world-class set of museums and more. And it certainly helps that the City of Oaks has been recognized as one of “America’s Favorite Food Cities” by Travel and Leisure, called one of the “Hottest Food Cities of the Year” by Zagat and racked up a whole bunch of James Beard Foundation Award nominations in recent years.

With 48 hours in Raleigh, you can hit some of the most noted places to eat and drink—we’ve curated a two-day itinerary packed with a plethora of things to do!

Day One

Morning
Start your day by paying a visit to Beasley’s Chicken + Honey, located in downtown Raleigh. Opening up at 11am on Sat. and Sun. for the brunch crowd, you’ll want to show up a bit earlier than that to snag a spot near the front of the line at this popular eatery from James Beard Award-winning chef Ashley Christensen. You can’t go wrong with their famous fried chicken and waffles drizzled in honey, a true Southern staple, or try the Hot Chicken Eggs Benedict—two poached eggs with Béarnaise sauce, creamed collard greens and buttermilk biscuits.

Afternoon
After a delicious brunch, venture out to visit some of the 15+ museums across the area. Pop into the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences in downtown Raleigh to see the Southeast’s largest natural history museum. With four floors of exhibits, live animals, gift shops and restaurants, you can definitely spend hours here. Take the path down the skywalk and check out the Nature Research Center, a wing of the museum where you can watch research scientists at work. A coffee or a smoothie from the museum’s restaurant—The Daily Planet Cafe—works as a great afternoon pick-me-up if needed.

Right across from the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences is the North Carolina Museum of History, showcasing more than 14,000 years and 150,000 artifacts of N.C. history, from native inhabitants to the 20th century.

If you’re someone who likes to keep moving, check out the multitude of other museums such as the North Carolina Museum of Art, where both indoor and outdoor exhibits and more than a dozen galleries are worth exploring (and the 164-acre Ann and Jim Goodnight Museum Park, featuring monumental public art installations, may steal the show on a beautiful day).

End your museum tour at CAM Raleigh—a progressive museum curating the most contemporary works of art and design possible—those still emerging, growing and living. Get inspired by the architecture, art and exceptional service. Exhibitions change throughout the year and the museum is free to the open public on First Fridays.

From CAM, it’s just a quick walk to either The Pit (whole hog goodness with a gourmet touch) or Clyde Cooper’s BBQ (at 80 years old, one of the longest-running barbecue joints in the state) for a healthy dose of authentic North Carolina ‘cue. Chopped pork sandwiches, fork-tender brisket, a side of hush puppies and generous helping of banana pudding are musts on any visit to the area.

Afterwards, stop by Boxcar Bar + Arcade for post-lunch drinks and games. You can bring your kids or simply act like one at this bar filled with hundreds of arcade games, a full liquor bar and 24 constantly-rotating draft beers from local breweries. Enjoy beers made just down the road like Hell Yes Ma’am from Raleigh Brewing Company and Shotgun Betty from Lonerider Brewing Company while reliving your childhood.

Evening
Once you’ve worked your appetite back into high gear, head to MOFU Shoppe in downtown Raleigh for dinner, a new restaurant born from the makings of a local food truck that won season six of Food Network’s “The Great Food Truck Race,” and features menu items inspired by the foods commonly eaten in several Asian countries (but with Southern influence!). A selection of small plates like the pork and chive dumplings along with crispy smoked pork belly, plus large plates including the five-spice duck and buttermilk fried flounder tacos, lead a menu full of favorites that are tough to choose between.

If you’re in the mood for seafood, try 18 Seaboard, a top-rated destination for delicious cuisine, service and hospitality. We recommend starting with their oysters topped with pimento cheese and prosciutto before enjoying a large plate option (menu items like the blackened snapper with green garlic, spring squash and Spanish romesco are always winners).

If you’re still full from lunch, head to The Cortez for light appetizers and cocktails. Check out their oyster bar where they have dollar oyster happy hour from 5-6pm, Tues.-Sun. Along with oysters, try a handcrafted cocktail like the O.T. Daiquiri, which contains toasted coconut infused rum, lime, brown sugar and fresh pineapple.
Late Night
After dinner, take a walk around downtown Raleigh to make room for dessert! Both Videri Chocolate Factory and Bittersweet are great places for a post-dinner sweet treat.

At Videri, order the frozen hot chocolate to be enjoyed on a warm summer evening or buy some chocolate bars to take back with you as gifts or snacks for yourself (open until 10pm on Fri. and Sat.).

Head to Bittersweet if you want a booze-themed dessert—try their famous Salty Chipwich Ice Cream Sandwich rolled in bourbon caramel corn or split the Key Lime-Tequila Parfait with a friend (open until 2am Thurs.-Sat., Bittersweet is a go-to late night date spot). Whichever you choose, you can’t go wrong!

Day Two

Morning
For your second day in Raleigh, start the day at one of these two restaurants with unique, community-oriented models: A Place at the Table or Carroll’s Kitchen both allow you to enjoy delicious meals while simultaneously supporting great causes.

A Place at the Table is a pay-what-you-can cafe with a mission to provide community and healthy food for all, regardless of means. You can’t go wrong with a latte and the buttermilk biscuit with sage sausage gravy at A Place at the Table. This classic Southern breakfast is perfect to get your busy day started!

Carroll’s Kitchen is another great option and is a non-profit social enterprise restaurant dedicated to ending homelessness for women in Raleigh. They also provide job training, life skills mentoring and even housing for women. We recommend ordering a few of the assorted kolache, a doughy pastry containing either sweet or savory fillings. Carroll’s Kitchen has a variety of delicious flavors from spinach and feta to cream cheese crumble.

After breakfast, drive over to the JC Ralston Arboretum at North Carolina State University to explore all 10 acres of beautiful gardens yourself, or you can take a free guided tour, available on Sundays. There are 14 different areas at the Arboretum, each housing a different variety of plants and flowers. Take the whole family and let the kids run around or walk hand-in-hand with your significant other while taking in the beautiful views.
Afternoon
Once you’ve worked your appetite back up, relax at the Raleigh Beer Garden where you can choose from the more than 350 beers on tap. With three floors dedicated to beer, there are limitless options. Once you’ve decided on a beer, order delicious bar food like the St. Arnold Burger topped with beer cheese sauce or the dry rubbed chicken wings. With plenty of outdoor space, including a rooftop garden, the Raleigh Beer garden is a perfect warm-weather hangout.

If wine is more your thing, check out these two happening spots: Wine Authorities and The Wine Feed.  At Wine Authorities there are free tastings available every Sat. Enjoy local cheese plates that pair perfectly with wine. After you’ve tasted to your heart’s content, take a few bottles home with you!  The Wine Feed is another great wine bar that offers a variety of classes and tastings.

Evening
After you’ve shopped and drank your way through Raleigh, it’s finally dinner time again. For your last meal in Raleigh try one of the many award-winning restaurants—Crawford and SonPoole’s Diner or Garland have earned both their respective chefs and the City of Oaks plenty of national recognition of late.

Led by five-time James Beard Award semi-finalist chef Scott Crawford, Crawford and Son—named 2018 Restaurant of the Year by The News & Observer restaurant critic Gregg Cox—serves up high-level dishes from a seasonal menu in a casual, neighborhood setting that allows guests to feel right at home. Our best advice here is to order as many small plates to share as you can handle, and absolutely be sure to leave room to taste a couple of the desserts.

If you’re looking for classic Southern comfort food, Poole’s Diner is the place. Another brainchild of renowned chef Ashley Christensen, Poole’s has spent the last decade making its mark on the downtown Raleigh restaurant scene (and is known around the world for the macaroni au gratin—seen in the header above—which they serve more than 15,000 dishes of per year!).

If you’re looking for something innovative and bursting with unique flavors, try Garland. The menu is put together by Cheetie Kumar, a James Beard semi-finalist chef, and is influenced by the flavors of India and east Asia. Be sure to ask your server for some personalized suggestions from the menu, but we’re big fans of the lamb curry and the Cauliflower 65.

Late Night
It’s time for some live music! Visit Slim’s Downtown, one of downtown Raleigh’s oldest bars and music venues. Since 1999, Slim’s has provided a stage for bands on the rise as well as established acts wanting to play in a more intimate setting. You can often catch some of your favorite musicians up close and personal at Slim’s. Check out their online music calendar for acts playing during your 48 hours in Raleigh!

Kristen Baughman, Visit Raleigh Insider

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2017 Holiday Events: Santa Visits, Christmas Tree Lightings, Sleigh Rides, Parades, Festivals

APEX

The Halle Cultural Arts Center presents two holiday productions in December. See Infinity Ballet perform “Nutcracker Dances” Dec. 1-3, and two musicals in one with “A Fairy Tale Christmas Carol” and “The Great Big Holiday Bake Off: A Confectionary Christmas Musical” Dec. 8-10. Visit etix.com for show times and to purchase tickets.

CARY

See 20 light displays illuminated by thousands of LED lights at the Chinese Lantern Festival at Booth Amphitheatre in Cary Nov. 24-Jan. 14. The hours are 6-10 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday. The festival also features cultural performances and artisans. Purchase tickets, $15 for adults and $10 for ages 3-17, online at boothamphitheatre.com/nc-chinese-lantern-festival-cary.

The 2017 Cary Christmas Parade, sponsored by the Cary Jaycees, is Dec. 9 at 1 p.m. See the website for the parade route. caryjaycees.org/cary-jaycees-christmas-parade.

Cary Ballet Company presents “The Nutcracker Suite” Dec. 15-17 at the Cary Arts Center. Purchase tickets, $21-$25, at etix.com/ticket/v/8087/cary-arts-center.

Cary’s Menorah Lighting is Dec. 19 at 5:30 p.m. at the Cary Arts Center. The town’s Kwanzaa Celebration is Dec. 29, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. townofcary.org.

DURHAM

Carolina Ballet presents “The Nutcracker” Dec. 9-10 at the Durham Performing Arts Center. See the website for show times and to purchase tickets at carolinaballet.com.

Moscow Ballet’s “Great Russian Nutcracker” takes place Dec. 13-14 at 7 p.m. at Carolina Theatre in Durham and features world-class Russian dancers, nesting dolls and giant puppets. Purchase tickets online at ticketmaster.com.

Christmas in the Piedmont During the Civil War at Bennett Place State Historic Site in Durham celebrates the season Dec. 16, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., with living historians who demonstrate cooking and gift-wrapping in the 19th century. Santa visits with families during the event. Candlelit tours of the site take place from 6-9 p.m. Tickets are required for the tours and are $3 for adults and $2 for ages 5-16. 919-383-4345. bennettplacehistoricsite.com.

RALEIGH

 

“Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer: The Musical” lands at Fletcher Theater for performances Nov. 24-Dec. 24. Purchase tickets, $15 and up, at ticketmaster.com.

Theatre in the Park presents “A Charlie Brown Christmas” Dec. 1-10. See the website for show times and to purchase tickets. Theatre in the Park’s production of “A Christmas Carol” is Dec. 6-10 at Raleigh Memorial Auditorium and Dec. 14-17 at the Durham Performing Arts Center. See the website for show times and purchase tickets at ticketmaster.com.

Raleigh Little Theatre presents its holiday sugarplum, “Cinderella,” Dec. 1-17. See the website for show times and to purchase tickets. raleighlittletheatre.org.

RALEIGH LITTLE THEATRE’S “CINDERELLA” CHARMS AUDIENCES OF ALL AGES DEC. 1-17. PHOTO COURTESY OF CARRIE SANTIAGO

Mordecai Historic Park’s Holiday Open House in Raleigh welcomes families Dec. 9, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., and Dec. 10, 1-4 p.m. Tour the home as it would have been decorated for Christmas during colonial days through the World War II era. Admission is free. Take one of the lantern tours, which run 5-8:30 p.m. on Dec. 9, through the house and grounds to watch vignettes of the Mordecai family, soldiers and enslaved people during the Civil War. Purchase tickets, $5 per person, at reclink.raleighnc.gov (click on “advanced search” and search for “Mordecai”).

Raleigh Ringers’ Holiday Concerts Dec. 9-10 at Meymandi Concert Hall showcase unique interpretations of sacred, secular and popular music arranged just for handbells. See the website for show times and to purchase tickets. ticketmaster.com.

The Trans-Siberian Orchestra’s holiday spectacle, “Ghosts of Christmas Eve,” is Dec. 13 at 7:30 p.m. at PNC Arena. ticketmaster.com.

Carolina Ballet presents “The Nutcracker” Dec. 15-24 at Raleigh Memorial auditorium. See the website for show times and purchase tickets at carolinaballet.com.

The renowned Raleigh Boychoir presents “Carols of Christmas” Dec. 22 at 7 p.m. at Edenton Street United Methodist Church. Purchase tickets, $8-$18, at raleighboychoir.org.

First Night Raleigh takes place Dec. 31, 2 p.m.-midnight, in downtown Raleigh. Enjoy a variety of family-friendly activities prior to the Acorn Drop at midnight. A First Night button, $10, is required for entry. firstnightraleigh.com.

RING IN THE NEW YEAR AT FIRST NIGHT RALEIGH. PHOTO COURTESY OF ARTSPLOSURE/FIRST NIGHT RALEIGH

OTHER TRIANGLE TOWNS

Visit Lights on the Neuse in Clayton, a 1-mile, tractor-pulled Christmas hayride through a magical extravaganza of holiday lights on select nights in November and December. The event also offers a sweet shop and visit with Santa. See the website for hours and to purchase tickets. lightsontheneuse.com.

Hop aboard an open train car with all the trimmings when New Hope Valley Railway in New Hill hosts its annual Holiday Santa Trains. Santa Claus and his elf visit with each child and pose for photos. Trains run Dec. 2, 3, 9 and 10, departing at 9:30 a.m.,11 a.m., 12:30 p.m., 2 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Visit the website for prices and to purchase tickets. triangletrain.com.

RIDE THE RAILS WITH NEW HOPE VALLEY RAILWAY IN DECEMBER. PHOTO COURTESY OF NEW HOPE VALLEY RAILWAY

The Pittsboro Christmas Parade is Dec. 10 at 3 p.m. and features seasonal floats, tractors, vintage vehicles, Santa and more. pittsboronc.gov.

Smithfield’s annual Christmas Tree Lighting is Dec. 7 at 7 p.m. at the corner of Third and Market streets. Enjoy hot chocolate, live entertainment and an appearance from Santa. The annual Smithfield Christmas Parade is Dec. 14 at 7 p.m. on Market Street. smithfield-nc.com.

The Lighting of Wake Forest  The town’s holiday parade, featuring high school marching bands, more than 100 colorful floats and Santa, takes place Dec. 9 at 1 p.m. in downtown Wake Forest. wakeforestnc.gov.

Take a covered wagon hayride through the holiday lights, and enjoy bonfires, a jumping pillow, train rides and music at Hill Ridge Farms’ Festival of Lights in Youngsville Nov. 23-Dec. 31, 5-9 p.m. Sunday-Thursday, and 5-10 p.m. Friday-Saturday. Admission is $10 for ages 2 and older Sun., Mon., Tues and Thurs.; $12 for ages 2 and older Fri.-Sat.; and $8 on Wed. hillridgefarms.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Triangle homes selling at ‘historically’ rapid rate

Home sales in the Triangle’s 16-county region were up nearly 4 percent in October, and the median sales price is 8 percent above the same time period last year. Meanwhile, the average number of days a home stays on the market sunk 10 percent to 44 on the year, compared to 49 at this point in 2016, according to Triangle Multiple Listing Service.

In a separate report for the month of October, appraiser Stacey Anfindsen found that within the four core counties of Wake, Orange, Durham and Chatham, a house stayed on the market for an average of just 36 days.

“That’s historically low,” says Anfindsen, whose publication is titled the Triangle Area Residential Realty report. “It’s gone down in increments. We’re kind of at the bottom of that now.”

While homebuyers are snapping up houses at record rates, housing supply also continues to narrow. In October, the Triangle’s four core counties had an average of two months of housing inventory available. Typically, market equilibrium for inventory is considered to be about 6 months of supply.

In particular, inventory is low for homes under $400,000, and that can stifle sales, Anfindsen says. These trends aren’t new – it’s been this way for the last two years. And they seem to be holding across the board for each of the Triangle’s core counties.

The story is slightly different in Wake County, where home sales inched up 1.5 percent in October and 2.5 percent on the year. Still, the median sale price is up 8.8 percent, at $284,000. In Orange County, home sales are more sluggish. They are down 2 percent on the year, and the median home price dipped slightly, by 0.3 percent, to $306,000.

By , Triangle Business Journal