Tag Archives: Raleigh NC

Things to Do in Raleigh, N.C.: October 2018

It’s so long to summer, hello to fall! We’ll miss these warm-weather months—baseball games, summer festivals, outdoor concerts and such. But we’re ready to embrace a new season and the new experiences that come with it in the Raleigh area—hockey games, cultural festivals, holiday shopping, pumpkin pies, lots of ways to experience the arts and (last but not least!) the N.C. State Fair!
Carolina Hurricanes—back in action!

Seven home games in Oct. 
Is it October yet? That’s what hockey fans have been asking for a few months since the Stanley Cup Finals ended in June. Yes, it’s Halloween month, and that means the NHL’s Carolina Hurricanes return to the ice at PNC Arena to kick off their 21st season in Raleigh. The Canes (as everyone locally calls them) will play seven home games in Oct., with the puck dropping for the first time against the Islanders (10/4) on opening night. They’ll also take on the Rangers (10/7), Canucks (10/9), Avalanche (10/20), Sharks (10/26), Islanders again (10/28) and Bruins (10/30). Single-game tickets have gone on sale, so join the #Redvolution by wearing red, white and black and cheering on the Canes!

N.C. State Fair

Oct. 12-21 (note: updated opening day due to Hurricane Michael)
For many, the return of the N.C. State Fair (10/12-21) marks the true beginning of fall. Sunny days turn into cool and clear nights where smells of cotton candy fill the air, blinking lights from Ferris wheels and roller coasters light up the skies and jackets and sweatshirts become a necessity. The largest annual event in N.C., with 1,000,000+ visitors, this is the chance to search out thrilling rides, take in more than 100 free concerts from local artists plus devour the most over-the-top food concoctions you can imagine—think chocolate, peanut butter, bacon, doughnuts and tons of other gooey goodness. We wouldn’t miss it!

SAS Championship

Oct. 12-14
See some of golf’s best, including legendary pro Colin Montgomerie who will return to defend his 2017 title, at the SAS Championship, a PGA Tour Championships event. Held annually at Prestonwood Country Club in Cary, the event is widely recognized as one of the most important events of the year. The tournament will once again play host to ‘Wildcard Weekend’—the last full-field event before the Charles Schwab Cup Playoffs.

The Beyond: Georgia O’Keeffe and Contemporary Art Exhibition

Oct. 13, 2018-Jan. 20, 2019
An exhibition of contemporary art at the North Carolina Museum of Art from renowned artist Georgia O’Keeffe, who revolutionized ways to see ordinary things, brings together a significant group of O’Keeffe’s works (featuring enormous flowers, luscious color and desert landscapes) as the centerpiece of an exploration of her continued force as a touchstone for contemporary art. This exhibit is ticketed in conjunction with Candida Höfer in Mexico.

Downtown Raleigh Food Truck Rodeo

Oct. 14
Attention, foodies! The final Downtown Raleigh Food Truck Rodeo of the year is this month. More than a half-mile of food trucks, spanning 11 city blocks, are bringing wood-fired pizzas, buttery lobster rolls, over-the-top ice cream concoctions, drool-worthy barbecue sandwiches and way, way more for thousands of hungry rodeo-goers to chow down on. Free admission, seating for 1,000-plus people and plenty of Instagram opportunities are just some of the elements that make this a can’t-miss foodie event.

SPARKcon 2018

Oct. 18-21
SPARKcon, the totally-weird, totally-awesome creativity festival that takes over downtown Raleigh each year, is truly a grassroots event. The “for the people, by the people” approach uses an open-source planning process that allows more than 2,000 artists to be involved each year. Dance, fashion, music, film, food—if you can name it, you can find an event for it at the festival that spans nearly 15 city blocks. The festival has taken big steps to make it even more accessible for individuals with disabilities, including independent wayfinding navigation with BlindSquare, sensory-friendly packs, a SPARKcon Access Guide (available at the info tent and on the cubes at every intersection) and more (get details here).

BugFest

Oct. 20
Experience more than 100 exhibits, crafts, games and activities at BugFest, North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences‘ annual event that lets you interact with entomologists and other scientists while learning about the fascinating world of bugs. Featuring the ever-popular Café Insecta, where the brave can sample buggy dishes prepared by local chefs. The best part? The event is totally free for the expected 35,000 attendees. This year’s theme: crayfish and other crustaceans!

33rd International Festival of Raleigh

Oct. 26-28
The Raleigh Convention Center will host the 33rd International Festival of Raleigh, where more than 50 ethnic groups will be represented! The festival includes everything from international food and stage performances to fashion shows and beer and coffee tastings.

Apex Music Festival

Oct. 27
Now in its eighth year, the Apex Music Festival attracts thousands of fans to historic downtown Apex to enjoy live music, street vendors, food trucks, beer and wine and an eclectic mix of shops and restaurants. Two outdoor stages and one indoor theater will host a variety of acts from local, regional and national performers from many musical genres—rock, folk, R&B, bluegrass, country and more. The ticketed event, which is best suited for adults, has a full music lineup you can check out here.

FallFest at Dix Park

Oct. 27
The inaugural FallFest at Dix Park—a family-focused atmosphere with food, drinks, kids and adult activities and live entertainment—will include live music from the Milagro Saints and Counterclockwise String Band, a fun zone with inflatable rides and games, pony rides, face painting, a pumpkin patch and decorating area, hayrides, craft vendors and more fall activities. Food trucks with food, beer, ice cream and more will be on hand, but you can also bring your own small cooler or picnic basket. Dogs (on a leash) are welcome, too!

 by visitRaleigh

 

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A look at Triangle home prices at 2018 halfway point

Home sale trends continue to deepen throughout the Triangle at the halfway point of the year, with median prices rising 7 percent over last year.

The median price home now tops out at $265,000, up from $248,000 at this time in 2017, according to data tracked by the Triangle Multiple Listing Service.

The price increases come as the home market remains tight across the region. The number of new listings has risen, but only slightly, at just 1.8 percent over this time last year.

Anfindsen’s analysis of only the second quarter found an increase in new listings as well, but the uptick was mostly due to new homes and not the “needed” resale inventory priced under $400,000, according to the TARR report.

Demand for the limited inventory remains strong, with the average number of days a home sat on the market in the Triangle dropping from 37 through June of last year to 31 this year.

The trends aren’t unique to the Triangle. Home prices continue to rise across the country, especially in large metro areas. The trend is being driven by increased demand, fewer homes for sale and more expensive labor and materials costs for new construction.

Nowhere in the Triangle are the price increases as steep as Durham County, where the median sales price has jumped more than 11 percent over last year, rising to from $228,000 to $253,000. Average days on market also remain the lowest in Durham County, where the time it takes a home to sell has sunk from 29 days to 21.

Troubles with low inventory remain in Durham and Wake counties, where the number of new listings is about the same or just below last year. That is not the case on Johnston and Orange counties, where new listings have increased more than 10 percent and 8 percent, respectively.

The Triangle still ranks favorably in housing affordability compared to its peer cities, but that could be changing in the near future. Data analytics firm CoreLogic continues to rank Raleigh and the Durham-Chapel Hill metro area as having housing markets that aren’t over-valued, but the company’s economists believe that could change in the next five years as prices and interest rates rise. “Between house prices rising and mortgage rates going up, the monthly mortgage payment to buy a house rises faster than the monthly income of local residents,” CoreLogic Chief Economist Frank Nothaft says.

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Raleigh ranks best place in NC to raise a family

A new ranking of the best U.S. cities for raising a family ranks Raleigh the top spot in North Carolina.  And Raleigh placed at No. 6 in the nation.

Charlotte landed just outside of Zumper’s top 10 cities to raise a family – at No. 11.

For the study, real estate website Zumper says it looked first at the 100 largest cities in the nation by population – those it also compares each month in its rent reports – and then whittled that list down to 95 cities after omitting places with overlapping or incomplete data. The report measured each city using 10 metrics, each of equal weight: rent cost per additional room; percentage of income spent on rent; percentage of income spent on mortgage; median household income; current unemployment rate; infant care costs; percentage of population under the age of 45; high school dropout rate; average commute time; and violent crime rate. The final score determined each city’s ranking.

Nine of the top 10 locales for raising a family were located in the South or the Midwest. Zumper credits that to lower mortgage expenses, shorter commutes, strong local economic conditions and lower infant care costs in those areas.

Raleigh scored 86.5 out of 100 possible points. Its highest score came in monthly housing costs followed by median household income, dropout rate, population percentage under 45 and crime. The City of Oaks received its poorest score in income percentage spent on rent.

Of the Triangle region, Zumper says: “Families considering a move to the area would also benefit from the strength of the Raleigh metro area as a whole, as neighboring cities Chapel Hill and Durham are both home to large universities and could be attractive places to start a family.”

Zumper ranked Madison, Wisconsin as the best overall city to raise a family and Baltimore as the worst.

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